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Blizzard Bliss: Discover the Secret to Crafting a Snowstorm in a Jar!

By: Knowledge Crates

Winter days might not always bring snowstorms, but that doesn't mean you can't create one right at home! Get ready to spark curiosity and excitement in your child with a simple and captivating experiment called "Snowstorm in a Jar." Not only will this activity amaze your little ones, but it's also an excellent way to teach them about science and chemical reactions in a fun-filled manner.

 

Supplies:

 

  • Large mason jar or clear plastic cup: this will be our main stage for the snowstorm ❄️

     

  • White paint: a couple of drops is all

     

  • Baby oil: enough to fill the mason jar or cup

     

  • Alka-Seltzer packet: a single packet will be more than enough

     

  • Small cup: for mixing the paint

Step 1: Prepare the Paint

  • Add two drops of white paint to the small cup. Think of each drop as roughly the size of a quarter.

     

  • Fill the cup about one-third of the way with water.

     

  • Mix the paint and water thoroughly until you get a uniform white mixture.

 

Ask Your Child:

 

“What do you think will happen when we add the paint mixture to the baby oil? Why?”

 

Encourage your child to share their thoughts and predictions before moving on to the next step. This will keep them engaged and excited about what's to come!
 

Step 2: Fill the Mason Jar/Large Cup with Baby Oil

 

Now we'll create our snowy backdrop inside the large cup: 

 

  • Take the large mason jar/cup and fill it approximately two-thirds of the way with baby oil. 

child pouring baby oil into a cup for alka seltzer snowstorm experiment

Step 3: Introduce the Paint Mixture

 

It's time to add a touch of winter magic to our oil-filled cup!

 

  • Slowly pour the white paint mixture into the baby oil-filled solo cup.

     

  • Watch closely as the paint mixture descends through the oil.

 

Ask Your Child:

 

"What happens to the paint as it enters the baby oil? "

 

Observe together and discuss the fascinating reactions taking place within the cup.


 

girl doing akla seltzer snowstorm experiment

Step 4: Let the Paint Settle

  • Allow a moment for the paint to settle at the bottom of the cup. 

     

  • You'll notice a mesmerizing layer forming at the base, setting the stage for our snowstorm.

 

Ask Your Child:

 

"What do you think will happen when we add the Alka Seltzer to the cup? Why?"

 

Encourage your child to share their predictions. Their imagination and curiosity will make the next step even more thrilling!

Step 5: Create the Snowstorm Effect with Alka Seltzer

Now, it's time for the grand finale:

 

  • Open the Alka-Seltzer packet.

  • Break a piece of the tablet into smaller chunks or pieces.

  • Begin by adding one small piece of the Alka-Seltzer tablet to the cup filled with baby oil and paint. Watch in awe as a snowstorm begins to form right before your eyes!

  • Continue adding small pieces of the Alka Seltzer tablet to intensify the snowstorm effect inside the cup.

The chemical reaction between the Alka-Seltzer, which contains citric acid and sodium bicarbonate, and the water in the paint mixture creates a bubbling and swirling effect, mimicking a real snowstorm.

child doing akla seltzer snowstorm experiment

And there you have it—a magical snowstorm encapsulated in a jar! This engaging and educational activity not only entertains but also educates children about the fascinating world of science and chemical reactions. The combination of simple materials and step-by-step instructions makes it easy for parents and educators to replicate this experiment with ease.

 

As you explore the wonders of the "Snowstorm in a Jar," remember to ask questions and encourage your child's curiosity at every step. Whether it's predicting the outcome or discussing the science behind the magic, involving your child in the process enhances their learning experience and creates lasting memories! 

children watching snowstorm in a jar

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